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img Dr. Eldred B. Taylor, M.D. is a well-known, dynamic speaker on functional and anti-aging Medicine. He is a sought-after radio and television personality. Dr. Taylor has been featured in local and national publications. He is the co-author of two books, "Are Your Hormone Making You Sick?" and "The Stress Connection". Dr. Taylor is originally from Nashville, Tennessee, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He earned his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Taylor completed his internship and residency specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University where he served as Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He served as Assistant Clinical Professor at Emory University School of Medicine for many years. Dr. Taylor also served as a faculty member for the Fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine for several years where he taught basic and advanced hormone replacement to hundreds of fellows. He is an internationally known medical lecturer and leading expert on functional medicine with a special focus on diagnosing and treating hormonal imbalances. To date, Dr. Taylor has provided over 500 hours of continuing medical education on functional and anti-aging medicine. He currently practices functional and anti-aging medicine in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife, Ava Bell-Taylor, M.D.

Hormone Replacement By The Book: The ongoing controversy concerning bio-identical hormone replacement can be answered by applying gynecological endocrinology. The recognized authoritative textbook worldwide on gynecologic endocrinology is Speroff L, Glass R, Kase N. Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility. 7th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD, 2005. Speroff in his book states, "The ultimate biologic response reflects the balance of actions of the different hormones with their respective receptors." To achieve the ultimate biologic response one must prescribe hormones identical to those made by the body, known as bio-identical hormones. The body produces the optimum physiological response when bio-identical or endogenus hormones bind to receptors. The second requirement is that the hormones have to be balanced and at their normal physiological levels to produce the ideal biological response. It is much easier to balance hormones if they are measured appropriately. I will discuss the pros and cons of blood, saliva and urine measurement of hormones. Speroff’s textbook answers all questions about estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and the other steroid hormones. By reviewing gynecologic physiology and biochemistry and applying these basic principles healthcare providers will be able to make logical decisions concerning restoration of hormone balance. Restoration of hormone balance is the key to treating PCOS, PMS, irregular bleeding, preventing breast cancer, treating peri-menopause, menopause and osteoporosis.
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img Dr. Zava received his doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Tennessee in 1974. As founder of ZRT, he has been instrumental in developing research projects with physicians and academic groups to understand the role of steroid hormones in health and disease for the past decade. He co-authored a landmark book, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life. His blog can be found at http://david-zava.blogspot.com and his company at www. zrtlab.com

Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer Risk: Even though mortality caused by diseases of aging (e.g. heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis) is much greater than that of breast cancer, women’s greatest fear is the diagnosis of breast cancer. Research and clinical studies clearly show the benefit of lifestyle intervention in preventing primary breast cancer and secondary recurrence. At the cellular level the types of estrogen metabolites that form, more so than the level or type of estrogen present, predicts the extent of DNA damage and risk for developing breast cancer. Methods to monitor the types of estrogen metabolites, and therefore breast cancer risk, are now available through testing in urine.

Elements and Thyroid: Optimal thyroid hormone synthesis by the thyroid gland and peripheral cellular conversion of T4 to T3 is essential for energy homeostasis. Low production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland, due to low iodine or competition of synthesis by halogens like bromine, can lead to low levels of T4 and T3. Moreover, extra-thyroidal conversion of the bioinert T4 to the active T3, which comprises the majority of the T3 formed and utilized by the peripheral tissues in the body, is strictly dependent on one of two selenium-dependent thyroid deiodinases. Arsenic and mercury form exceptionally tight bonds with selenium, preventing its incorporation into deiodinases, and thus have the capacity, when in excess relative to selenium, to indirectly inhibit intracellular T4 to T3 conversion. In some parts of the world intake of iodine and/or selenium is low, leading to iodine.
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img Dr. Guilford is both a clinician and a researcher. His education includes Johns Hopkins University for his undergraduate degree, the University of Texas Medical Branch for medical school, 2 years of general surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and an ENT surgery residency at the University of Michigan and Board Certification in ENT. Dr. Guilford has been in clinical practice since 1979, has used complementary medicine in his practice since 1985 and was the director of a clinical laboratory specializing in in-vitro allergy and viral immunology testing (1982-1992). He began using metal detoxification methods in 1995 and research into the toxicity of mercury led to the observation that glutathione is both a key component of the antioxidant system and a critical component of the defense against heavy metals. His interest in mold related health problems has led to research into the role of mycotoxins in chronic disease. Dr. Guilford’s study of the role that glutathione plays in the basic mechanism of many diseases led to his formulating a liposome encapsulation of reduced glutathione, Readisorb® Glutathione. Dr. Guilford’s recent publications include articles on the neuroprotective qualities of liposomal glutathione, the detection of mycotoxins in mold-exposed individuals, and a review of glutathione, atherosclerosis and immune responses in conditions with low glutathione.

Oxidation Stress and Metabolism of Cancer: Oxidation stress may cause the changes in the cellular microenvironment that may result in the development of cancer. An alteration in the metabolism of cells that leads to cancer may be linked to oxidation stress in the tumor microenvironment. Oxidation Stress leads to the formation of a symbiotic relationship between cells with active mitochondria and the fibroblast support cells, metabolizing glucose, that may result in a tumor mass. This relationship has been described as "a two compartment model" by Michael Lisanti, MD, PhD and his lab associates. This presentation will discuss the role that oxidation stress may play in creating the metabolism of the cell mass we call cancer.
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img Dr Lommen is a licensed Naturopathic Physician and is enjoying her 25th year of clinical family practice and health optimization utilizing Natural and Integrative Medicine. She was a clinical investigator for a successful 5-year study through the NIH (National Institute of Health) on chronic disease. Dr Lommen previously taught as an Associate Professor at NCNM (National College of Naturopathic Medicine) for 10 years. She is the CEO and Assoc. medical director of Labrix Clinical Services Inc. She is the co-author of the popular book: Slim, Sane and Sexy; Pocket Guide to Natural, Bioidentical Hormone Balancing (3rd printing Fountain of Youth Publishing-www.slimsaneandsexy. com). Dr Lommen is a sought-after speaker at medical conferences including presentations on GI Health, Bioidentical Hormone Balancing, PCOS and Metabolic Syndrome, Adrenal Fatigue, Depression and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Cravings & Addiction. Television interviews include both local and national stations, most notably; CNN. She enjoys hiking, biking and reading in her spare time.

Cravings, Contentment and Correcting Chemical Imbalances: Did you know that there may be 20% brain shrinkage similar to that caused by cocaine addiction from internet addiction? I Were you aware that up to 36% of Americans may be experiencing impulse control problems? II Addiction is far more common than one may suspect and is likely to present in everyday clinical practices (especially now with the newest DSM-V classification which recognizes certain behavioral patterns as addiction (i.e. gambling) III. What are cravings? And do they lead to compulsive use? And does loss of impulse control and giving in to cravings actually lead to addiction? It appears the answer is yes IV. But is it the chicken or the egg. Does one crave substances because they need to ‘feel good’ or do they find that these things 'feel good' and hence crave more of them? What elements or predisposition may set up these patterns of craving, destructive habits of distraction and compulsive behaviors to take on a life of their own and run amok?

Chemical imbalances may be at the heart of cravings and addiction, and hence a major culprit in derailing our patients' best intentions. Patients may hope to stay on our prescribed programs of dietary intervention and lifestyle changes to include regular exercise and new routines of meditation and mindfulness. However, they often find themselves not entirely in charge of some of choices they make. In fact, many times cravings and behavior patterns ARE truly out of their control since they may be dictated by substantive biochemical agents which are far more persuasive than one's "resolve to do better" V. Our minds are wired to seek what the body may need. Our chemistry is programmed to enhance searching and finding of that which feels good (reward seeking) as this was at one time, synonymous with what the body needed. Hence the reward based activity in the brain is strongly encouraged. VI VII Understandably, many patients find themselves trapped in a vicious cycle of trying-and failing-trying and failing …over and over again. Whether it is sugar, alcohol, binge eating, gambling or other behaviors; no wonder many people feel demoralized and depressed about their potential progress…and very reticent at the thought of trying yet again-another health program.

First, the cravings need conquering. Laying a strong foundation through neuroendocrine balancing is essential. It should include adrenal resilience, sex steroid optimization and balancing of the key neurotransmitters; serotonin, dopamine, GABA and norepinephrine. This presentation will provide tools for how to evaluate and interpret lab assessments to get at the root causes of cravings and behaviors. It will also elucidate the most current findings to encourage employment of natural bio agents which cut cravings off at the pass V, set a patient up for success, and provide the roadmap to reaching and sustaining optimal health.
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img Dr. Aristo Vojdani is a renowned immunologist who obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in the fields of microbiology and clinical immunology with postdoctoral studies in tumor immunology at UCLA. His on-going research, spanning a 45-year career, focuses on the role of environmental triggers, such as toxic chemicals, infections, dietary proteins and peptides, in complex diseases. He owns 15 US patents and has published over 140 articles in scientific journals. Dr. Vojdani is the CEO of Immunosciences Lab and a professor of neuroimmunology at the Carrick Institute for Graduate Studies, and is a past associate professor at the Charles Drew/UCLA School of Medicine and Science. He is the CEO and Technical Director of Immunosciences Lab., Inc. in Los Angeles, CA, and sits on the editorial board of six scientific journals. In 2006, Dr. Vojdani was given the prestigious Herbert J. Rinkel Award by the American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) for excellence in teaching the techniques of environmental medicine.

The Gut-Brain Axis in Automotive and Neuroimmune Disorders: The human body is an intricate system with bidirectional communication between organ that requires balance and harmony for optimal performance. The parallels between the gut and brain immune systems are self-evident. These similarities extend to the actual structures, mechanisms and even biochemistries of the two systems: the gut immune barrier (GIB) and the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). The gut’s influence on the brain cannot be overestimated, so much so that it can be called a second brain. This presentation will review the link between gut dysbiosis, infections and inflammation to brain-related disorders such as depression, anxiety, multiple sclerosis and autism. By understanding the mechanisms of environmental triggers of gut dysfunctions that lead to autoimmunity or neurological disorders, it may be possible to prevent, ameliorate and even reverse autoimmune disorders, both gastrointestinal and neurodegenerative, through treatment modalities involving the repair of the GIB and BBB, thus restoring the functionality of their barriers and the stability of their environments.
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img Dr. Eldred B. Taylor, M.D. is a well-known, dynamic speaker on functional and anti-aging Medicine. He is a sought-after radio and television personality. Dr. Taylor has been featured in local and national publications. He is the co-author of two books, "Are Your Hormone Making You Sick?" and "The Stress Connection". Dr. Taylor is originally from Nashville, Tennessee, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He earned his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Taylor completed his internship and residency specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University where he served as Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He served as Assistant Clinical Professor at Emory University School of Medicine for many years. Dr. Taylor also served as a faculty member for the Fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine for several years where he taught basic and advanced hormone replacement to hundreds of fellows. He is an internationally known medical lecturer and leading expert on functional medicine with a special focus on diagnosing and treating hormonal imbalances. To date, Dr. Taylor has provided over 500 hours of continuing medical education on functional and anti-aging medicine. He currently practices functional and anti-aging medicine in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife, Ava Bell-Taylor, M.D.

Stress Connection: Functional medicine cannot be practiced effectively, if one does not have an extensive understanding of the impact of stress on patient health. An article in 2001 published by the Journal of Metabolism entitled "The Impact of Stress", states that 75-90% of all visits to primary care physicians are for stress-related complaints or disorders. Stress has been linked to all the leading causes of death. Stress affects a wide array of medical conditions ranging from cardiovascular disease and cancer to obesity. It is essential that health care providers understand how to identify an unhealthy stress response and stress related conditions. Treating the underlying cause should always be the objective in functional medicine. This lecture will discuss how to measure stress and treat stress related illnesses.
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img Dr. Cheryl Burdette, N.D. received her Doctor of Naturopathy degree from Bastyr University in 2001. She completed her residency at Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Dr. Burdette is currently in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia at Progressive Medical Center, one of the largest Integrative Medicine clinics in the Southeast. She has been the director of the only naturopathic residency program in the U.S. that trained in functional medicine and nutritional biochemistry. She serves on an IRB board and reviews studies related to complementary and alternative therapies. Dr. Burdette is one of the authors of the book, Laboratory Evaluations in Molecular Medicine and has published in many journals including Alternative Medicine Review and Clinical Chemistry. She is an often-sought speaker and is invited to present at Grand Rounds at all of the Naturopathic medical schools as well as educational events for M.D.s, D.O.s and other allied healthcare practitioners. Dr. Cheryl Burdette has been a member of the BOA for an Inc 500 supplement company since 2009. She serves as a faculty member at University Bridgeport. She also teaches at the University of Miami, the first medical program to include integrative medicine in the core curriculum. She is president and education director of Dunwoody Labs. In this position she is involved in clinical trials of different nutritional products as well as development of functional testing profiles. Her marriage between clinical practice and laboratory oversight, gives her a unique perspective in evidence-based natural therapies, testing and research.

The Science of Food; Lowering the Inflammatory Load Through Lifestyle: Allergic reactions are classified into four types. Our food allergy profile detects Type II/III responses, which are associated with a delayed allergic response that is mediated by an IgG response and immune complexes. Within this immune complex, the complement component 3 (C3) is converted into C3d, which is an activator of the complement cascade. Food allergy testing is gains sensitivity when IgG is combined with C3d.

Borrowing from technology developed by one of the original immunologists who worked on the polio vaccination and considered an expert in complement, noted that complement is amplified and is even necessary to trigger an allergic reaction, or more specifically a histaminergic reaction. While complement antigens as well as immunoglogins are both documented in the literature to be associated with allergic reactions, it is the two together that are the most sensitive measure of delayed food sensitivity. When looking to the research, the phenomenon of complement binding to an IgG subtype to create pathology is well documented.
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img Dr. Fresco is Founder and President of Bio-Botanical Research, Inc. Since it’s inception in 1989, Dr. Fresco has utilized her background in medical herbology, naturopathy, Chinese Medicine and clinical nutrition to create products that have a significant on health and wellness, serving the needs of health professionals, pharmacies and individuals.

The Good, The Bad, and The Microbiome -The Role of Intestinal Ecology in Chronic Disease: In this presentation we will explore the topic of intestinal ecology and the relationship of dysbiosis to overall health, and disease. We will review the main gut pathogens such as yeast, bacteria, and parasites, as well as biofilms and endotoxins, and the role they play in inflammation and systemic conditions including chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia and auto-immune disease.

An overview of lab testing that may be used to diagnose dysbiosis, as well as the symptomatic presentation of patients with chronic 'leaky gut' will also be covered. To aid clinicians in effective treatment, a multi-pronged strategy will be discussed, including botanicals, nutritional supplements, diet and other integrative approaches.
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img Dr. Jay H. Mead, MD, FASCP, is the Founder and Medical Director of Labrix Clinical Services, Inc. and a visionary in developing for innovative testing for discerning practitioners. He is a leading expert in salivary hormone testing. Dr. Mead has been practicing as a clinician for over twenty years and understands the need and value of accurate, reliable laboratory testing. Dr. Mead is a board certified pathologist (AP/CP), a retired USAF Flight Surgeon and co-founder of a progressive full service complementary and alternative medical clinic. He also has board certification in blood banking and lead the Pacific Northwest Region of the American Red Cross as the Chief Medical Officer for over 10 years. Dr. Mead is the co-author of the well-received book: Slim, Sane and Sexy; Pocket Guide to Natural, Bioidentical Hormone Balancing. Dr. Mead is a nationally recognized speaker having delivered hundreds of presentations and trainings sessions in the field of integrative medicine.

Becoming Immune To Cancer: There may be as many forms and types of cancer as there are individual people and for this reason, our one-size-fits-all conventional medical approach leaves ample room for improvement. Immunity, hormonal status, adrenal resilience, liver function, GI function and sleep quality may play a critical role in staying fit when it comes to battling the cancer cells our bodies routinely produce. This presentation will offer an understanding of the interplay between our many endocrine and metabolic systems. Building upon this foundation and learning how to functionally evaluate each individual in order to assess their unique profile so an individualized program for "immune hardiness" can be rendered. This presentation will detail integrative medicine strategies for strengthening the immune system and which may ward off cancer. It will provide tools that practitioners need to design successful "anticancer" treatment plans including IV nutrients, hormones, nutraceutical and dietary programs. Return to the office on Monday morning and equip your patients to win their immune battles.
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img Dr. Russell M. Jaffe is CEO and Chairman of PERQUE Integrative Health, LLC (PIH) a company that offers the world scientifically proven, integrative health solutions that speed the transition from sick care to healthful caring. Dr. Jaffe has more than 30 years of experience contributing significantly to molecular biology and clinical diagnostics. His focus is on functional, predictive tests and procedures designed to improve the precision of both diagnosis and of treatment outcomes and he has authored nearly 100 articles on the subject. He received his B.S., M.D. and Ph.D. from the Boston University School of Medicine, completed residency training in clinical chemistry at the National Institutes of Health and remained on the permanent senior staff before pursuing other interests, including starting the Health Studies Collegium think tank. Dr. Jaffe is board certified in Clinical Pathology and in Chemical Pathology. He currently serves on the American Board of Clinical Metal Toxicology and coordinates its certification training program Dr. Jaffe is the recipient of the Merck, Sharp & Dohm Excellence in Research Award, the J.D. Lane Award, and the U.S.P.H.S. Meritorious Service Award, and was honored as an International Scientist of 2003 by the IBC, Oxford, England, UK for his lifetime contributions to clinical medicine, biochemistry, immunology, methodology, and integrative health policy.

Predictive Biomakers in Clinical Nutrition: Treatment outcomes based on symptoms suppressed are more costly and less effective than those based on promoting the causes of good health and avoiding the consequences of ill health. Beginning with the fundamentals the focus of this presentation will be around 8 validated functional predictive biomarker tests. The emphasis on these tests brings out the importance attached to physiology in promoting health at the present time and in charting out the course of a healthy life in the future; pillars of a personalized, evidence based practice today.

Goal values are more useful than usual values. Current lab practices use reference ranges based on statistics, in turn based on only 50-100 specimens. "Least risk, most gain" goal values for each test can be directly translated into quality years of life "conserved" or "at risk". This is the next big step in interpretive lab medicine and include the following tests: 1. Hgb A1c with a goal value of < 5% that means a 10-year probability of survival of 99%.
2. hsCRP with a goal value of < 0.5 mg/dl that means a 10-year probability of survival of 98+%.
3. Homocysteine with a goal value of < 6 µmol/ml that means a 10-year probability of survival of 98+%.
4. LRA by ELISA/ACT tests to assess immune defense and repair tolerance and acquired hypersensitivity to specific epitopes.
5. OxLDL/HDL cholesterol with a goal value of 0 indicating antioxidant sufficiency
6. 8 oxo guanine: a urinary metabolite indicating oxidative stress at the nuclear level and with a goal value of < 5.3ng/mg of creatine
7. Vitamin D3 with a goal value of 50-80 ng/ml determining adequate cell communication
8. pH in urine after six or more hours of rest with goal range of 6.5-7.5 that means adequacy of buffering minerals or excess of cell metabolic acids.
Laboratory tests became more meaningful in practice when Galen and Gambino introduced the concepts of sensitivity, specificity, and predictive index introduced in Beyond Normality and applied by Mildred Seelig among others to functional nutrition.

Building on these predictive biomarkers, this presentation will discuss The Alkaline Way , a vital tool : functional epigenetics in practice. Since any essential deficit in a complex biological system comes to control the function of the entire system, proactive prevention using predictive biomarkers can make functional epigenetics useful in clinical practice through bringing each of the predictive biomarkers to their healthiest goal value. Certain key nutrients are essential to heal from within, repair and help achieve the best of health. Clinical examples will include discussion on which nutrients can help and cases where immune tolerance has been restored and autoimmunity’s many expressions are better managed.

A goal of integrative, comprehensive, personalized medicine is one where the individual receives those therapies and remedies that will optimize quality of life and minimize costs and risks. Predictive biomarkers are the next generation advance to bring lab medicine to the nutrition clinic with added benefit to the patient consumer, that is, all of us when it comes to healthful caring. Preliminary data from labs on 65,000 autoimmune, immune dysfunction, and hypersensitivity cases over 30 years suggests that these predictive markers are independent and interdependent assessments of health risk and status.

First line comprehensive care for each risk factor is either nutritional in terms of what people eat and drink or attitudinal in terms of what people think and do. First line comprehensive nutritional approaches to each of the predictive biomarkers when they are not at their goal values will be presented including case examples. Emphasis is on more predictive diet and supplement, activity and attitude interventions with evidence and experience to validate them.
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img Dr. Nathan Goodyear is the founder, co-owner, and lead physician at Seasons in Farragut, Tennessee. His passion for wellness began with his own 100 pound post-football career weight loss. Dr Goodyear is dedicated to offering the latest advancements in Wellness medicine with the most holistic approach to treatment possible based in science. Dr Goodyear’s passion for Wellness extends beyond his clients, to helping his fellow physicians and medical practitioners enjoy the same Wellness medicine. Dr. Goodyear received his Bachelor of Arts from Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, LA and Doctor of Medicine from LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, LA. He is Board Certified in Gynecology and is a Fellowship-Trained Metabolic Specialist (Anti-Aging/Regenerative Medicine). He was the Chief Resident in Obstetrics/Gynecology at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Dr. Goodyear’s first book, "Man Boob Nation An Integrative Model to Low Testosterone", looks at the causes of low Testosterone and the physiologic consequences of low Testosterone in men. Dr. Goodyear’s first book is an extensive review of the scientific literature on low Testosterone as the effect and not the cause.

The Biochemical Dysfunction(s) of Metabolic Syndrome: Metabolic Syndrome; the name has changed over the years, but the underlying importance in health is the same. Metabolic syndrome is the doorway to disease. A syndrome is a collection of items running together. Individually, they don’t say much. Collectively they speak loudly of biochemical dysfunction and impending disease. How big is the problem? Approximately 25% of the worlds adult population suffers with metabolic syndrome. Sadly, metabolic syndrome is not just an adult problem. Twelve percent of adolescents have been found to meet the criteria of metabolic syndrome. A study of Canadian Qii Cree children, found metabolic syndrome at a rate of 18.6%. The focus needs to change from the syndrome and its individual components, to a Functional approach of the biochemical causes of the syndrome to restore metabolic function and health.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as:
  • Waist circumference (> 40 inches in men; > 35 inches in women)
  • Elevated triglycerides (>150)!
  • Reduced HDL (< 40 in men; < 50 in women)
  • Elevated blood pressure (>130/85)
  • Elevated fasting glucose (>110)

What we see manifest in out patients with Metabolic Syndrome is merely the physical effects of biochemical, metabolic dysfunction--A biochemical puzzle that has a unique solution for each individual provided through:
  • Nutrition
  • Exercise
  • Hormones>
  • Inflammation
  • Detoxification

Medical dogma points to a one-size-fits-all treatment strategy. Dogma points to the 5 parameters of Metabolic Syndrome as the focus and the problem. Dogma points to the evaluation and treatment of men and women with Metabolic Syndrome the same. Dogma follows marketing-based medicine instead of real evidence-based medicine.

Jean-Marie Lehn said it best: "Science has nothing to do with dogma. Science ceases to exist when there is a dogma." This lecture will focus on a Functional medicine approach to the treatment of Metabolic Syndrome. A Functional medicine approach to Metabolic Syndrome treats the individual and unique cause(s) of the biochemical dysfunction that results in the physiologic manifestations of disease. A Functional medicine approach to Metabolic Syndrome is not interested in dogma, but science. What does the science say?
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img Dr. William B. Grant, Ph.D., has been conducting health research since 1996 while working as a NASA atmospheric scientist. He published the first paper linking diet to risk of Alzheimer’s disease in 1997. In 1999, he turned his attention to the roles of solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiance and vitamin D in reducing the risk of cancer, publishing a key paper in 2002 that added ten types of cancer to the list of five for which solar UVB was associated with reduced risk, presumably through production of vitamin D. He retired from NASA in 2004, moved to San Francisco, and formed Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center, a nonprofit organization, in order to devote his fulltime attention to research and education on the primary risk-modifying factors for chronic and infectious diseases related to diet and UV/vitamin D. He was a co-author on the seminal paper in 2006 hypothesizing that epidemic influenza was seasonal due to seasonal variations of solar UVB doses. He has published a pair of studies on the role of solar UVB in reducing the risk of autism. He has 215 publications listed at pubmed.gov as well as several book chapters on vitamin D and/or UV radiation. He has collaborated in setting vitamin D guidelines for Central European countries in 2012 and for those with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities in 2014. He has given a number of invited talks on UV and vitamin D in the U.S., Europe and the Middle East.

The Benefits of Vitamin D for Chronic and Infectious Diseases: We will review the role of vitamin D in reducing the risk of many chronic and infectious diseases based on epidemiological studies, randomized controlled trials, and investigations of the mechanisms of action. The presentation will outline what is known from epidemiological studies, randomized controlled trials, and laboratory investigations on the mechanisms of vitamin D actions. We will review the role of vitamin D in reducing risk of incidence, progression, and mortality from diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, autism, bone diseases, many types of cancer, cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, respiratory infections, and sepsis. I will also review the guidelines regarding optimal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, testing these levels, and how to maintain optimal levels will also be presented.
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img Dr. Zava received his doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Tennessee in 1974. As founder of ZRT, he has been instrumental in developing research projects with physicians and academic groups to understand the role of steroid hormones in health and disease for the past decade. He co-authored a landmark book, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life. His blog can be found at http://david-zava.blogspot.com and his company at www. zrtlab.com

Estrogen Metabolism and Breast Cancer Risk: Even though mortality caused by diseases of aging (e.g. heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis) is much greater than that of breast cancer, women’s greatest fear is the diagnosis of breast cancer. Research and clinical studies clearly show the benefit of lifestyle intervention in preventing primary breast cancer and secondary recurrence. At the cellular level the types of estrogen metabolites that form, more so than the level or type of estrogen present, predicts the extent of DNA damage and risk for developing breast cancer. Methods to monitor the types of estrogen metabolites, and therefore breast cancer risk, are now available through testing in urine.

Elements and Thyroid: Optimal thyroid hormone synthesis by the thyroid gland and peripheral cellular conversion of T4 to T3 is essential for energy homeostasis. Low production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland, due to low iodine or competition of synthesis by halogens like bromine, can lead to low levels of T4 and T3. Moreover, extra-thyroidal conversion of the bioinert T4 to the active T3, which comprises the majority of the T3 formed and utilized by the peripheral tissues in the body, is strictly dependent on one of two selenium-dependent thyroid deiodinases. Arsenic and mercury form exceptionally tight bonds with selenium, preventing its incorporation into deiodinases, and thus have the capacity, when in excess relative to selenium, to indirectly inhibit intracellular T4 to T3 conversion. In some parts of the world intake of iodine and/or selenium is low, leading to iodine/
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img Dr. Andry is Assistant Clinical Professor at Indiana University School of Medicine and president of Andry Medical Services. He received his medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine and has been in practice for 16 years. He is a leader in the fields of personalized and preventative family medical care, bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, and hormonal/behavioral weight management. Dr. Andry holds dual board certifications. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Family Medicine and the American Board of Obesity Medicine. Dr. Andry has been elected to the Board of Directors as a Trustee of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians, a world-wide organization dedicated to the medical treatment of the obese and overweight.

The Biochemistry and Psychology of "Diabesity": Obesity and diabetes are overwhelming health problems in the westernized world. The reasons for this are many but effective treatment and prevention of these conditions is of paramount importance for our society. The roots of this problem lie in how our genetic and metabolic machinery has evolved in an environment radically different, culturally and chemically, from the one in which we now reside. Behaviors must change if we are to ever see improvement in these conditions. The thoughtful Functional Medicine Clinician will embrace the need for behavioral change in his or her patients and the effective one will deeply understand the many barriers that exist for our patients to implement these changes. Additionally, whether or not they are used in your management, a thorough understanding of the workings of current pharmacologic therapies can provide valuable insight into the pathophysiology of diabetes and obesity. These derangements of metabolic function not only provide their own targets for management, but often constitute some of the very barriers that keep our patients from making the changes needed for better health. The great Functional Medicine Clinician in addressing and overcoming these barriers can profoundly improve the likelihood of our patients implementing and maintaining the behaviors needed for healthier living.
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img Dr. Campbell is a regional expert and international lecturer on wellness. She attended college at the University of Illinois, earning both a BS and MS in biology. From there, she attended the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, studying medicine for the body, mind and spirit. Following Medical School, she completed her Family Medicine residency at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. Dr. Campbell is double board certified in Family Medicine and Integrative and Holistic Medicine. She has specialty interests in innovative medical practice design, functional and restorative medicine, Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy and Vitamin D. Dr. Campbell is the founder, owner, and sole physician in Campbell Family Medicine. She provides medically supervised nutrition education, massage therapy, infrared sauna, breast thermography and more.

Protecting the Aging Brain: Functional Neurology: Applying physiologic principles to improve function of the aging brain should be part of every clinician’s tool box. A new specialty of Functional Neurology exists with extensive training and continuing education offerings, yet few physicians know about it. The cerebellum normally thought of as the organ of balance and coordination also coordinates memory and higher order thinking. Care of older adults should include assessment of memory, cognition and balance, since rehabilitating balance also improves memory and cognition. Data on the morbidity and mortality of balance disorders with accompanying falls and fractures is compelling and much can be done to rehabilitate the brain to reduce these risks.

Simple office tools such as balance assessment diagnostics like the 5 sec balance test can be done, but secondary and tertiary referring facilities utilize video nystagmography and Computerized Assessment of Postural Systems and other tools to quantitatively assess balance and vestibular efficacy. Once vestibular dysfunction is identified, treatment protocols exist for both the impaired vestibular ocular reflex and optokinetic nystagmus.

Tools exist for the early objective identification of Memory and Cognitive Impairment. Examples include the MMSE, clock drawing test, and AD8. SPECT imaging for mTBI and dementia can be important because SPECT abnormalities can be seen up to 10 years before cognitive decline. Treatments can encompass functional rehab, physical exercise and brain games, binaural sound therapy and neuropsychological retraining, as well as diet and targeted nutritional supplementation.
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img Dr. Eldred B. Taylor, M.D. is a well-known, dynamic speaker on functional and anti-aging Medicine. He is a sought-after radio and television personality. Dr. Taylor has been featured in local and national publications. He is the co-author of two books, "Are Your Hormone Making You Sick?" and "The Stress Connection". Dr. Taylor is originally from Nashville, Tennessee, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He earned his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Taylor completed his internship and residency specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University where he served as Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He served as Assistant Clinical Professor at Emory University School of Medicine for many years. Dr. Taylor also served as a faculty member for the Fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine for several years where he taught basic and advanced hormone replacement to hundreds of fellows. He is an internationally known medical lecturer and leading expert on functional medicine with a special focus on diagnosing and treating hormonal imbalances. To date, Dr. Taylor has provided over 500 hours of continuing medical education on functional and anti-aging medicine. He currently practices functional and anti-aging medicine in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife, Ava Bell-Taylor, M.D.

The Role of Stress and Hormones on Brain Health
Stress damages the brain and causes brain atrophy. Psychological and physiological stress contributes to brain degeneration. Stress decreases the activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) while increasing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS).
Stress leads to elevated cortisol. Cortisol is detrimental to the hippocampus, the seat of learning and memory. The hippocampus also regulates the circadian rhythm. High levels of cortisol cause the hippocampus to lose control of the sleep wake cycle, which leads to insomnia. Insomnia is associated with chronic medical conditions.
Stress and cortisol also leads to disruption of the reproductive system and sex hormone production. Sex hormones have an enormous effect on brain function. Hormones influence emotions and brain function. I will discuss how hormones effect neurotransmitters and why hormone balance and neurotransmitter balance are important for healthy brain function.

Educational Goals
1. Understand the stress response and its direct affect on the brain
2. Understand how stress and aging affects hormones
3. Understand how hormones affect neurotransmitters
4. Understand the relationship between hormone balance and neurotransmitter balance
5. Discuss methods to accurately measure a. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity in clinical practice b. Cortisol and its effects c. Frontal and temporal lobe function in clinical practice d. Sex hormones
6. How to treat stress, neurotransmitter and hormone imbalances and document results objectively
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img Dr. Zava received his doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Tennessee in 1974. As founder of ZRT, he has been instrumental in developing research projects with physicians and academic groups to understand the role of steroid hormones in health and disease for the past decade. He co-authored a landmark book, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life. His blog can be found at http://david-zava.blogspot.com and his company at www. zrtlab.com

The Role of Steroid Hormones and Their Neuroactive Metabolites in Brain Development and Function
Gonadal (estrogens, progesterone, testosterone) and adrenal (DHEA, cortisol) hormones have profound effects on neurotransmitter synthesis and function through their interactions with classical steroid receptors present in different regions of the brain. Some of these steroids (e.g. progesterone) are also converted peripherally and within the brain (e.g. progesterone) to metabolites (e.g. allopregnanolone) that react directly with and modify neurotransmitter interaction with membrane neuroreceptors (e.g. GABA receptors). The direct interactions of steroid hormones and their neuroactive steroid metabolites on neurotransmitter production and function, as well as their effects on behavior, will be addressed.

Educational Goals:
1. Describe the differences in steroid hormones and neuroactive steroid hormone metabolites
2. Differentiate neuroactive steroids derived from gonadal and adrenal steroids from classical neurotransmitters derived from amino acids
3. Discuss the effects of gonadal and adrenal steroid hormones and their neuroactive metabolites on the CNS
4. Elaborate on the pros and cons of using different body fluids (urine, blood, saliva) and methods (Immunoassays vs GC/LC-MS) to monitor neuroactive steroids and neurotransmitters
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img Dr. Eldred B. Taylor, M.D. is a well-known, dynamic speaker on functional and anti-aging Medicine. He is a sought-after radio and television personality. Dr. Taylor has been featured in local and national publications. He is the co-author of two books, "Are Your Hormone Making You Sick?" and "The Stress Connection". Dr. Taylor is originally from Nashville, Tennessee, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He earned his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Taylor completed his internship and residency specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University where he served as Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He served as Assistant Clinical Professor at Emory University School of Medicine for many years. Dr. Taylor also served as a faculty member for the Fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine for several years where he taught basic and advanced hormone replacement to hundreds of fellows. He is an internationally known medical lecturer and leading expert on functional medicine with a special focus on diagnosing and treating hormonal imbalances. To date, Dr. Taylor has provided over 500 hours of continuing medical education on functional and anti-aging medicine. He currently practices functional and anti-aging medicine in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife, Ava Bell-Taylor, M.D.

Understanding the Disease of Obesity
Healthcare providers must be involved in decreasing the incidence of obesity. If we fail to treat obesity and its related illnesses, obesity may bankrupt our healthcare system. The advice of “ Monitor calories in vs. calories out, eat right and exercise” has failed us and not produced significant change in the incidence of obesity. Obesity and weight management is very complex and is influenced by multiple internal and external factors. Hormones such as thyroid, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA and leptin have an affect on weight. If these hormones are out of balance, calories in vs. calories out and exercise and eat right will not result in significant weight loss.
Genetics and epigenetics have been found to influence weight and obesity. The hypothalamus affects weight control. The balance of neurotransmitters influences food cravings. Food sensitivities increase inflammation, which can lead to weight gain. Gastrointestinal conditions like yeast overgrowth, dysbiosis and leaky gut must be evaluated and corrected when treating patients that can’t lose weight. External factors called obesogens have been shown to cause weight gain and inhibit weight loss. If the body’s detoxification system is unable to detoxify these chemicals they will alter normal metabolic pathways and lead to obesity.

Educational Goals:
1. Help participants recognize the many factors involved in weight loss and weight management
2. Provide information on in- office testing and lab testing to identify the factors involved in each patient's struggle with weight
3. Discuss ways to treat the contributing factors involved in weight management
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img Dr. Tom Bayne is a chiropractor and international expert in digestive health and detoxification. His philosophy addresses the relationship between structure and function of the human body and how that translates into your best health. Dr. Bayne is the owner of PureBalance Natural Family Healthcare in Glenview, Il. He is the former director of the Institute for Functional Medicine Europe, Great Smokies Diagnostic Laboratory (now Genova) and Biodynamics (now Metagenics Europe).

Understanding the Role of Commensal Spore Based Organisms in Clinical Practice (Non CME Lecture)
You are more bacteria than you are human with 10 trillion human cells outnumbered by the 100 trillion bacteria cells in your body. Learn the latest information from the Human Microbiome Project and the Colorspore project that illustrate just how important these 100 trillion passengers are. Major studies over the past 5 years have outlined the required characteristics of a true probiotic and requirements for effective clinical use. These studies further demonstrate the benefits of a true probiotic, which include improved and complete digestion, immune development and modulation, and key nutrient production

Educational Goals
1. Learn how well established probiotic foods and probiotic products in the marketplace fall short in providing these needed benefits for your patients
2. Learn about the clinical applications of commensal spore based organisms in health and disease
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img Dr. William Shaw is an innovative researcher dedicated to an understanding of the biochemical influences on health and wellness. Dr. Shaw received a doctorate in biochemistry and human physiology from the Medical University of South Carolina. He is board certified in the fields of clinical chemistry and toxicology by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry. He has supervised large endocrinology, nutritional biochemistry, toxicology, and immunology departments at the Centers for Disease Control and Smith William Shaw, Ph.D. Kline Laboratories. He served as Director of Clinical Chemistry, Endocrinology and Toxicology at Children’s Mercy Hospital. Dr. Shaw is the director of Great Plains Laboratory, Inc. in Lenexa, Kansas, specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of mitochondrial disorders, neurological diseases, chronic immune diseases, and much more. He is author of Biological Treatments for Autism and PDD and Autism: Beyond the Basics and is a frequent speaker at autism conferences worldwide. Dr. Shaw is the stepfather of a child with autism and has helped thousands of parents and physicians successfully contribute to improving the lives of children with autism.

Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health
A high percentage of all people are now exposed to a soup of toxic chemicals. Toxic chemical exposure has been implicated as a major factor in impaired learning ability, attention deficit, hyperactivity, pervasive developmental disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and autism. Documentation of common chemicals in the environment that cause illnesses and their sources will be presented along with methods to prevent exposure and to remove them when exposure has already occurred. Metals are one of the most common groups of toxic chemicals and the treatment of toxic metal exposure will be examined.

Educational Goals:
1. The attendee will learn how humans are exposed to a wide variety of toxic chemicals
2. The attendee will learn which toxic chemicals can cause human disease
3. The attendee will learn the most toxic metals in the environment as well as trace elements that are toxic in excess
4. The attendee will learn techniques that can be used for the elimination of most toxic chemicals in the environment
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img Dr. Denis Wilson is a leading medical expert on thyroid disorders. He developed the concept of Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome. As a result of his clinical research and findings, Dr. Wilson developed the WT3 protocol for Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome and originated sustained release T3. He is the author of Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome, A Reversible Low Temperature Problem, Doctors Manual for Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome, and the recently released Evidence-Based Approach to Restoring Thyroid Health.

Maximizing Results and Wellbeing in Thyroid Diagnosis and Management
Recent research has demonstrated that much more regulation of the thyroid system occurs in the periphery than previously thought. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is responsible for maintaining an appropriate level of thyroid hormones that the cells can use to provide for normal metabolism. Just as vital, recent research has uncovered thyroid-signaling pathways that regulate the thyroid system on a cellular level. The ubiquitin proteasome system controls the level of deiodinase enzyme, thereby determining T4 to T3 conversion. All this crucial intracellular activity is not measured by thyroid blood tests. This might explain why some people with normal thyroid blood tests still have low body temperatures and symptoms of low thyroid function that may warrant the empirical use of T3.
Most doctors are not aware that mild to moderately low body temperature and hypothyroidism can contribute to symptoms such as PMS, migraines, panic attacks, depression, weight gain, hair loss, and many other symptoms, even when thyroid blood tests are normal. Dr. Wilson will review the evidence-based clinical research on triiodothyronine in peer-reviewed journals from the past 10 years. Dr. Wilson will describe a simple protocol for the empirical use of T3 in patients with low body temperatures and normal thyroid blood tests. Doctors will learn how cycling patients on and off T3 can often reset the body temperature so that the temperature and symptoms often remain improved off medicine. The use of nutrition and botanicals to support thyroid health will also be discussed.

Educational Goals:
1. Be able to describe the intracellular physiology of thyroid hormone pathways and body temperature
2. Be able to name 3 intracellular signaling pathways that direct the conversion of T4 to T3
3. Be familiar with the wide range of medical conditions that can be affected by body temperature and T3
4. Be able to explain when and why T3 might be desirable as an empirical treatment
5. Learn a simple protocol for administering T3
6. Learn the use of herbs and nutrition that support thyroid health
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img Dr. Nathan Bryan earned his Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry from the University of Texas at Austin. He received his doctoral degree from Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport where he was the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Research. Dr. Bryan pursued his post-doctoral training as a Kirschstein Fellow at Boston University School of Medicine at the Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute. He has been involved in nitric oxide research for the past 15 years and has made many seminal discoveries in the field. These discoveries and findings have transformed diagnosis and treatment of many chronic diseases associated with nitric oxide insufficiency. Dr. Bryan is a Professor of Molecular Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. He is the founder and Chief Science Officer of Neogenis Labs, a Texas based company started to commercialize nitric oxide based technologies and diagnostics.

The Role of Oxide in Health and Aging: From Telomeres to Sexual Function
Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important molecules produced within our body. The generation of NO by the constitutive enzyme, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is essential for normal physiological regulation of blood flow and nutrient delivery to tissues. Loss of NO production within the human body is associated with the onset and progression of a number of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Chronic use of L-arginine has proven ineffective in patients with some form of endothelial dysfunction. Aging is a complex process involving defects in various cellular components including endothelial dysfunction. The latest evidence suggests a unifying mechanism for cellular ageing that is relevant to the development of common age-related diseases. There is now emerging evidence that NO controls and regulates many processes that affect how we age as well as how well we perform as we age. The effects of NO go much farther than vascular control of blood pressure. Two important examples are telomeres and sexual function. NO is shown to control and regulate telomerase activation and telomere shortening, a main determinant of aging. There are many new compelling studies on this relationship. Further, one of the earliest signs of NO insufficiency is sexual dysfunction in men and women. While there are many therapies for male erectile dysfunction, treatments for females have been elusive. Data indicates that sexual sensitivity in menopausal females can be restored with nitric oxide therapeutics. An understanding of the role of NO at the cellular and molecular level in the control of aging and how that manifests into clinical symptoms will help clinicians recognize and treat a number of age related diseases. Recognizing NO deficiency early in the aging population and then implementing therapeutic interventions and lifestyle modification known to improve NO production will have a major impact on public health and the aging process. There is emerging and convincing data that dietary nitrite and nitrate can replenish NO homeostasis offering an effective dietary intervention for disease prevention. These concepts will be reviewed and discussed.

Educational Goals:
1. The audience will learn basic biochemistry of nitric oxide
2. To understand what causes loss of production of NO in humans
3. To understand the clinical symptoms and presentation of patients deficient in NO
4. To understand the long-term consequences of low NO and its effect on cellular aging
5. To learn safe and effective therapeutic and lifestyle strategies to restore and replete NO based signaling
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img Dr. Eldred B. Taylor, M.D. is a well-known, dynamic speaker on functional and anti-aging Medicine. He is a sought-after radio and television personality. Dr. Taylor has been featured in local and national publications. He is the co-author of two books, "Are Your Hormone Making You Sick?" and "The Stress Connection". Dr. Taylor is originally from Nashville, Tennessee, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He earned his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Taylor completed his internship and residency specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University where he served as Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He served as Assistant Clinical Professor at Emory University School of Medicine for many years. Dr. Taylor also served as a faculty member for the Fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine for several years where he taught basic and advanced hormone replacement to hundreds of fellows. He is an internationally known medical lecturer and leading expert on functional medicine with a special focus on diagnosing and treating hormonal imbalances. To date, Dr. Taylor has provided over 500 hours of continuing medical education on functional and anti-aging medicine. He currently practices functional and anti-aging medicine in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife, Ava Bell-Taylor, M.D.

The Fundamentals of Brain Health
The statistics are alarming:
¥ 1 in 8 Senior citizens develop Alzheimer’s
¥ 1 in 8 children are diagnosed with brain development disorders i.e. (ADD, ADHD and autism)
¥ Prevalence of dementia is reaching 24 million and is predicted to double every 20 years
¥ Anxiety disorders (OCD, learning disabilities and depression) are more prevalent today
¥ Poor brain health, sleep disorders, brain fog, mild depression and moodiness have become commonplace

As functional medicine clinicians, it is imperative that we understand brain physiology. We must play a crucial role in screening for early onset and potentially reversible cognitive impairment. Many treatable factors can lead to brain dysfunction. This lecture will review the basic function of the brain and peripheral nervous system. By understanding the physiology and anatomy of the brain and nervous system, the functional medicine provider can identify and begin treatment early in the process of cognitive decline and slow or reverse brain function deterioration.
We will review the basic needs of the brain for optimal health. I will discuss methods of testing and treating brain deficits. Increasing brain plasticity is important to overcome the inevitable loss of neurons. While younger individuals have more neurons, older healthy individuals have more connections between neurons that can help overcome cognitive impairment. It is important as we age that we engage in new learning to enhance our brain connections. By understanding how to improve brain and autonomic nervous system function the body as a whole will function better

Educational Goals:
1. To review basic structure and functions of the brain
2. Learn how to identify areas of the brain dysfunction
3. Review major factors that lead to poor brain health and function
4. Understand the association between leaky gut and the blood-brain barrier
5. Review ways to improve brain function by avoiding factors that diminish brain function,
nutritional supplementation, cognitive therapy and engaging in activities designed to increase positive plasticity
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img Dr. Valerie Ferdinand, ND is a graduate of the National College of Natural Medicine and received her bachelor of science in biochemistry and micro/molecular biology from Portland State University. She is a licensed naturopathic physician with an integrative medicine practice in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Ferdinand is a consultant with various laboratories including Kashi Clinical Laboratories and Purity Laboratories. She is an expert on genomic testing and the human exome. Dr. Ferdinand draws from her knowledge of clinical laboratory studies and the principles of functional medicine to help clinicians and their patients better understand their predisposition to disease, allowing for more informed treatment planning.

Pharmacogenetics - The Prescription Medication Puzzle
Patient response to medication is highly variable, and delays in treatment and medical management of potentially dangerous adverse events contribute to billions of dollars in health-related expenses each year. What if we could design a better medication strategy based on how each patient metabolizes medication? What if we could reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions before they happen?
Recent advances in genetics may help safeguard patients against adverse drug events while simultaneously delivering a therapeutic effect sooner than the traditional trial-and-error medication model. While the goal for healthcare providers has always been to reduce medication dependence, there are instances when drugs may help patients achieve their treatment goals.
In this presentation, we will discuss developments in pharmacogenetic testing that influence drug transport and efficacy, including common cytochrome P450 variants and additional genetic polymorphisms. The potential for pharmacogenetics to improve patient care … particularly for pain, psychiatric, and cardiovascular disorders… is extensive. With pharmacogenetic testing, the trial-and-error period of finding effective medication strategies is reduced, potential drug interaction effects averted, medication adherence improved, and patients’ overall risk of adverse events minimized.

Educational Goals:
1. Understand the basics of pharmacogenetic testing;
2. Understand the different phenotypes: poor, intermediate, extensive, and ultra-rapid metabolizer;
3. Understand how variations in each individual’s phenotypes affect medication prescribing;
4. Be able to recognize patients that would benefit from pharmacogenetics testing.
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img Emil K. Schandl, Ph.D., is a fellow of the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry, specialist in clinical chemistry, licensed nutritional consultant, clinical laboratory director with the Dept. of Health and Human Services and board member of the Florida Section of American Association for Clinical Chemistry. He received his Ph.D. in molecular genetics, at the Institute of Molecular Biophysics, housing Nobel Laureates, at Florida State University. Dr. Schandl is the laboratory director for American Metabolic Laboratories. He is a frequent speaker at the Cancer Control Society in California, where he received the Humanitarian Award, Medical Pioneer in Alternative Laboratory Testing. His main passion is early cancer detection and metabolic therapy. Dr. Schandl is international known, respected, and highly sought after for his expertise in cancer and its prevention,

Pre-visual Cancer Tumor Markers; Early Diagnosis of Cancer
The traditional ways of detecting cancer are palpation, X-rays, nuclear medicine, MRI, CT (PET), traditional clinical laboratory procedures, and biopsies. All of these methods are characterized by the necessity of a certain tumor mass, i.e. millions of cancer cells. The method presented here, a Cancer Profile (CA Profile), is looking not at the tumor itself but rather, some of its products. Consequently, the evolution of a cancer can be realized at a very early stage, before the growth is large enough to otherwise observe. According to epigenetics, individuals inherit cancer genes at the moment of conception. These genes remain dormant as long as they are not caused by internal and/or external environmental factors to express themselves, then it may take 8 to 12 years for a tumor to become visible. Utilizing the Cancer Profile, a developing tumor could be detected somewhere along these years. Once a tumor is large enough to be visualized, it already may be too late.
The importance to target and alter metastatic spread of cancer is a major element for therapy. The presence of AMF (autocrine motility factor, phosphohexose isomarase, i.e. PHI) and its receptor on the cell surface is an independent determinant of diagnostics and poor disease prognosis. PHI is a neurokine stimulating cytokinesis of dislodged tumor cells while it regulates and promotes anaerobic glucose metabolism, i.e. Emden-Meyerhof glycolytic and glucogenetic pathways. Amongst other functions, it is involved in the accumulation of ascites fluids.
For over the past 30 years PHI enzyme kinetic determinations have been an integral part of the Cancer Profile. It is strongly proposed that PHI is the cause of generating circulating tumor cells (CTC). CTCs leave the primary tumor, travel through the body’s vasculature, and seed for malignancy. It is proposed that PHI is not only the cause of cell dislodgement but it also jockeys the tumor cell to a new site for further proliferation. Furthermore, AMF (PHI) binds to HER2 and ablates the HER2 inhibitory effect of trastuzumab (Herceptin) in breast cancer cells. HCG hormone, the Autocrine Proliferating Factor (APF), is responsible for de novo DNA, RNA, protein synthesis necessary for cell division. It is the pregnancy and malignancy hormone. When detected at very low concentrations, it is present in more than 80% of all cancer
The above two determinants were found in developing tumors prior to visibility. The components of the Cancer Profile (CA Profile) are the above mentioned PHI, 2 ultra sensitive tests for HCG, CEA tumor markers. Liver health is monitored by GGTP, thyroid by TSH, and DHEA-S, the adrenal anti-stress, pro-immunity, longevity hormone test checks some immune status (T-cells). The CA Profile is an excellent, pre-visual tool for early cancer detection and follow-up. The Longevity Profile is like a bio-chemical full body scan without radiation exposure

Educational Goals:
1. Learn the cardinal importance of the use of the CA Profile in pre-visual, years ahead recognition of a developing cancer, and in particular
2. Learn the predictive, prognostic values of the HCG hormone, and PHI (GPI) enzyme, TSH, GGTP, DHEA-S, and the utilization of an extension of the CA Profile that looks closely at the function of other organs
3. Review clinical results and laboratory applications
4. Discuss the correction of early abnormal results in light of clinical laboratory findings based upon the application of epigenetic principles
5. Understand the goal of follow-up therapy to put cancer active genes into dormancy by the utilization of metabolic medical applications
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img Dr. Zava received his doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Tennessee in 1974. As founder of ZRT, he has been instrumental in developing research projects with physicians and academic groups to understand the role of steroid hormones in health and disease for the past decade. He co-authored a landmark book, What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer: How Hormone Balance Can Help Save Your Life. His blog can be found at http://david-zava.blogspot.com and his company at www. zrtlab.com

Hormone Metabolites and Breast Cancer
Estrogens play an essential role in the health and wellbeing of women throughout their lifespan. Estrogens regulate gene expression of over 200 different structural proteins and enzymes that control a myriad of functions in the body related to the health of the skin, bones, muscle, cardiovascular system, and brain.
While estrogens play an important role in maintaining health, their metabolism can result in mutagenic and carcinogenic intermediates in the absence of protective nutrients, presence of environmental toxins, and poor lifestyle choices. In his lecture, Dr. Zava will outline the pathways of estrogen metabolism and discuss how lifestyle, diet, exercise, stress, exposure to petrochemicals, intake of essential elements (iodine and selenium) and exposure to toxic elements (arsenic and mercury) play a role in directing the metabolism to “good” or “bad” estrogens and consequent decrease or increase risk for estrogen-associated cancers. He will also discuss methods commonly used for detecting estrogen metabolites.
Why should this topic be included to the conference program? One of the primary concerns for female patients who are considering hormone replacement therapy is how this may affect their risk of getting breast cancer. Health care practitioners need to know what the references and literature show regarding the risks for breast cancer associated with different choices of therapy. Increasing their knowledge and understanding of the influences, hormonal and otherwise, on breast cancer risks will allow practitioners to better address the goals of the patient requesting or requiring hormone replacement while addressing one of their greatest fears.

Educational Goals:
1. Discuss the multiple factors within the hormonal matrix that affect the risk of breast cancer including iodine deficiency and excess
2. Explain the differences in cancer risks between conventional and bio-identical therapies based on the latest findings in the scientific literature
3. Describe the physiological effects of estrogen and progesterone on breast tissue
4. Discuss clinical studies suggesting that progesterone therapy protects against breast cancer
5. Describe the role of insulin, thyroid hormones, cortisol, estrogen dominance, estrogen metabolism, progesterone, iodine and nutrition in the risk of breast cancer
6. Discuss exposure to heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, and mercury and their actions as metalo-estrogens and modulators of toxic estrogen metabolism
7. Elaborate how selenium and iodine are important for countering the toxic effects of heavy metals on estrogen pathways
8. Describe the typical profile of patients at increased risk for breast cancers
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img Aristo Vojdani is a renowned immunologist who obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in the fields of microbiology and clinical immunology with postdoctoral studies in tumor immunology at UCLA. His on-going research, spanning a 45-year career, focuses on the role of environmental triggers, such as toxic chemicals, infections, dietary proteins and peptides, in complex diseases. He owns fifteen U.S. patents and has published over 140 articles in scientific journals. Dr. Vojdani is the CEO of Immunosciences Lab and a professor of neuroimmunology at the Carrick Institute for Graduate Studies, and is a past associate professor at the Charles Drew/UCLA School of Medicine and Science. He is the CEO and Technical Director of Immunosciences Lab., Inc. in Los Angeles, CA, and sits on the editorial board of six scientific journals. In 2006, Dr. Vojdani was given the prestigious Herbert J. Rinkel Award by the American Academy of Environmental Medicine (AAEM) for excellence in teaching the techniques of environmental medicine

Food Immune Reactivity and Autoimmunity: Mechanism of Action
The American Autoimmune Related Disease Association reports that 53 million Americans have autoimmune disease. The evidence of decades of studies indicate that autoimmunity is a result of genetics, infections, environmental toxins, and diet. This presentation focuses on the relationship between food components, food immune reactivity and autoimmunity. It also features substances that can be detected in the human body and used to predict or diagnose disorders or reactivity. These biomarkers can also be used to identify harmful foods and help clinicians treat these foodimmune reactive conditions

Educational Goals: 1. To understand that the initiation of complex autoimmune disorders is impacted by environmental triggers such as toxic chemicals and dietary components.
2. To examine the mechanism responsible for the induction of autoimmunities by toxic chemicals and dietary components.
3. To learn that the early detection of antibodies against toxic chemicals and dietary components can facilitate a proper timely intervention and stop or even reverse the course of autoimmune disorders
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img Dr. Donese Worden is an Arizona based physician and global health educator. She is renowned for identifying and helping to bring unique healing modalities and therapies from abroad to the United States. Dr. Donese is a highly regarded expert in enzyme therapy, regenerative injection therapies, and bioenergetic medicine. As a sought after CME speaker, Dr. Worden has lectured for the American Academy of Pain Management, American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, ICIM, IPC, AOCPMR, ANMA, NANP, and various medical schools including U of A, ASU, Berkeley, SCNM and major U.S. hospitals. She appears frequently on TV and radio shows and news spots as a popular guest.

Have We Forgotten the Power of Enzymes?
Enzymes have been historically utilized for many medical conditions including pain management, cardiovascular, cancer, digestion, inflammation, scar tissue reduction, and fibroids. Enzymes are proteins that speed up chemical reactions. There are between 50,000 and 70,000 different enzymes in the body that regulate metabolic functions. Most people think about digestive enzymes but less than 99.999% have to do with digestion. The rest work systemically and metabolically.
Without enzymes we would be nothing more than a set of lifeless chemical substances made up of proteins, vitamins, minerals and water. Enzymes are the workers, and many physicians have forgotten the power and utilization of these molecules.
Learn how to utilize enzymes in your practice to address multiple complaints and learn how to select the appropriate enzyme for particular medical conditions and anti-aging benefits.

Educational Goals:
1. Demonstrate a foundational working knowledge of enzyme therapy in medical practice
2. Discuss the historical use of enzymes in medicine
3. Review the biochemistry and MOA of enzymes
4. Provide a foundational understanding of enzyme therapy
5. Discuss published peer reviewed clinical trials of enzymes and their use in pain management, digestion, inflammatory conditions and other medical uses
6. Provide appropriate medicine/protocol selection based on clinical symptomology
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img Dr. Tom O'Bryan is a nationally recognized author, lecturer and medical expert on Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance. He was recently selected as one of five nationally recognized presenters on 21st Century Endocrinology. He is the vice-president of the Illinois Chapter of the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists. Dr. O’Bryan is the past president of the Chicago Chiropractic Society and a past director of the Illinois Chiropractic Society. He is a Diplomate of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, Diplomate of the American board of Clinical Nutrition, and Certified Clinical Nutritionist with the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists. Dr. O’Bryan is a certified applied kinesiologist. He is a certified practitioner in functional biomechanics from the Motion Palpation Institute. Dr. O’Bryan has served as a visiting Instructor at Northeastern Illinois University where he taught Applied Nutrition For Health and Performance. He is a visiting instructor at the National University of Life Sciences.

Dietary ‘Fueling’ and Endotoxin ‘Initiating‘ Neurological Disorders
In recent years the interface between neuropsychiatry and gastroenterology has converged into a new discipline referred to as enteric neuroscience. In sensitive individuals, neurological disorders and auto-immune conditions have been associated with both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to gluten exposure. Evidence suggests a range of 10-22.5% for the prevalence of neurological dysfunction in patients with established Celiac Disease. The primary mechanism of antigen passage into systemic circulation initiating this inflammatory cascade has been identified to be antigenic intestinal permeability (IP). Among the several potential intestinal luminal stimuli that can trigger antigenic IP, small intestinal exposure to bacteria (including its endotoxin product-LPS) and gluten have been identified as the two more powerful triggers.
Additionally, endotoxin transport via fat (lipid raft) mediated endocytosis, gluten, and other food antigen penetration across gastrointestinal barriers are means by which environmental factors have been shown to impact neurotransmitter development, cognitive function and immune-related neurodevelopment. Identifying and addressing these pathways can arrest, and on occasion reverse the resultant dysfunction.
Emerging studies have shown that intestinal bacteria may directly communicate with the central nervous system by way of the vagal sensory nerve fibers and the peripheral immune system. For example, minute doses of microbes within the gastrointestinal tract, levels that do not trigger an immune response, are capable of influencing neurotransmission in the paraventricular hypothalamus, the central nucleus of the amygdala, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. All three of these regions are involved in the processing of emotions related to anxiety and mood . For nearly a decade, we have known that blood vessel structures in the human brain react strongly with IgA antibodies to gliadin (a peptide of wheat). Similarly, Enterobacteria have antigenic sites which are very similar to those of the lipid structures of neuronal tissue and may act as superantigens for T lymphocytes or may activate neuronal antibody production through a mechanism recognized as molecular mimicry.
Excess cytokine production may go on to initiate an auto-immune attack against vulnerable neurological tissue in the CNS including (but not limited to) asialoganglioside, myelin basic protein, pituitary, cerebellar, and hippocampal tissue. And in the peripheral nervous system, synapsin, alpha and beta tubulin. Identification of the mechanisms by which both cellular and humoral immune response influence neurofunction (behavior, neurotransmitter production, neurodegeneration,…) may reveal a panoply of personalized treatment options that target the unique contributions of the gastrointestinal and immune systems to cognitive and neurodysfuntion.
This Presentation will summarize the above-referenced contributions in the translocation of endotoxin and antigenic foods through GI epithelial transmigration (with or without intestinal permeability) and their neurological effects. Targeted intervention treatment options will be summarized

Educational Goals: 1. Recognize the incident frequency of a gluten-related disorder affecting neurotransmitter production and neurodevlopment
2. Recognize the incident frequency of endotoxin transmigration into systemic circulation
3. Recognize the contribution of endotoxin transmigration as an environmental trigger in the initiation and development of both cellular and humoral immune response in the nervous system
4. Recognize the contribution of gluten as a common environmental trigger in the initiation and development of both cellular and humoral immune response in the nervous system
5. Recognize the importance of early testing and follow-up monitoring of endotoxin transmigration and food sensitivities
6. Become familiar with the effectiveness of treatment protocols for the neurological consequences of endotoxin transmigration and food sensitivities
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img Dr. Tom O'Bryan is a nationally recognized author, lecturer and medical expert on Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance. He was recently selected as one of five nationally recognized presenters on 21st Century Endocrinology. He is the vice-president of the Illinois Chapter of the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists. Dr. O’Bryan is the past president of the Chicago Chiropractic Society and a past director of the Illinois Chiropractic Society. He is a Diplomate of the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, Diplomate of the American board of Clinical Nutrition, and Certified Clinical Nutritionist with the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists. Dr. O’Bryan is a certified applied kinesiologist. He is a certified practitioner in functional biomechanics from the Motion Palpation Institute. Dr. O’Bryan has served as a visiting Instructor at Northeastern Illinois University where he taught Applied Nutrition For Health and Performance. He is a visiting instructor at the National University of Life Sciences.

The Role of Food Sensitivities and Autoimmune Diseases
Musculoskeletal Disease includes much more than just mechanical imbalances. The causes are multifactorial, as are the treatments. This presentation will address the connection between the mechanisms in development of autoimmune diseases which are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the Industrialized world, and their musculoskeletal manifestations.
The initiation and early development of auto-immune mechanisms require a triad of factors which includes environmental triggers. The most prevalent and common environmental trigger today is the food we eat. We will look at the Dietary and Nutritional options that support musculoskeletal care.
This presentation will address the science identifying the mechanisms of development in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases and their musculoskeletal manifestations. We will also look at the dietary and nutritional contributions in the development of auto-immune diseases with an emphasis on protocols addressing, arresting and in some cases reversing the musculoskeletal manifestations.
Attendees will recognize that these conditions are presenting in their offices every day, and will leave with the tools to feel confident in recognizing and treating these conditions which may be manifesting as recurrent musculoskeletal pain that is not being eliminated with quality spinal care.

Educational Goals:
1. Review the numerous musculoskeletal manifestations of auto-immune disease
2. Walk attendees through the history of medicine’s understanding of food sensitivities and food-induced autoimmune disease. Explain the difference of physiology between food sensitivities, food intolerances, food allergies and food-induced auto-immune diseases
3. Review the scientific literature on the differential diagnosis of food allergies, food sensitivities and food-induced auto-immune diseases
4. Review the physiology of the auto-immune response in food sensitivities and food-induced auto-immune diseases
5. Review the many auto-immune diseases associated with food sensitivities and food-induced auto-immune diseases (Case Studies, etc)
6. Recognize the diversity of symptoms patients may present with as a result
7. Recognize when musculoskeletal pain is more than a mechanical problem
8. Recognize the incident frequency of food sensitivities
9. Recognize the likelihood of food sensitivities being an initiator of the inflammatory cascade in pain syndromes
10. Become familiar with the effectiveness of treatment for food sensitivities
11. Recognize the importance of early testing and follow-up monitoring of food sensitivities and allergies
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img Dr. George Gillson began his training with a Ph.D. in chemistry (atomic analytical spectroscopy) from the University of Alberta and then earned an MD from the University of Calgary. He practiced family medicine for 6 years (Northern Ontario and Oregon) before moving to the Tahoma Clinic in Kent, Washington. Prior to founding Rocky Mountain Analytical, a private testing laboratory in Calgary, Dr. Gillson was a consultant for several laboratories in the Pacific Northwest, in the field of steroid hormone analysis. Dr. Gillson has experienced the challenges of clinical practice firsthand, understands the role of the laboratory in the practice of medicine, and has solid expertise in the nutritional/natural approach to medicine. He is currently the Medical Director of Rocky Mountain Analytical and lectures for many groups and organizations nationally and internationally. Dr. Gillson brings extensive knowledge, experience and expertise in the field of Metabolic Medicine.

Methylation: What You Don’t Know About MSH
Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a widely used supplement popular for use in both humans and animals. Despite approximately 30 years of clinical use in inflammatory conditions, very little accurate information about its mechanisms and scope of action has worked its way into the public domain, despite a reasonably large body of research. In particular, we now understand how MSM exerts wide-ranging beneficial effects by interfering at multiple points in the Sterile Inflammation (SI) pathways. In the last several years there has also been a resurgence of interest in MSM as a chemopreventive agent for multiple types of cancer.
This talk will briefly review: the “history” of MSM, how it is formed naturally in the human body, dietary choices to boost endogenous levels. The majority of the talk will explore the mechanisms whereby MSM plays a role in SI and chemoprevention. Some discussion will also focus on the methyl- and sulfur-donation roles of MSM. An appendix (not covered in the lecture) will discuss supplementation with MSM, and the role of MSM and betaine in treating acid reflux.

Educational Goals:
1. Increase the “comfort level” of listeners in using MSM in clinical practice, by:
2. Educating listeners about the “history” of MSM and its potential clinical benefits
3. Informing about the endogenous production of MSM and the role of diet and gut flora
4. Reviewing Sterile Inflammation (SI)
5. Explaining how MSM interferes in the mechanisms of SI and cite studies pertaining to various sterile inflammatory conditions where MSM has shown to be helpful
6. Explaining how MSM may act as a chemopreventive agent
7. Discussing other mechanisms of action including methyl donation and sulfur donation
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img Dr. Nathan Goodyear is the founder, co-owner, and lead physician at Seasons in Farragut, Tennessee. His passion for wellness began with his own 100 pound post-football career weight loss. He is dedicated to offering the latest advancements in traditional medicine with the most holistic approach to treatment possible. Dr. Goodyear received his Bachelor of Arts from Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, LA and Doctor of Medicine from LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, LA. He is Board Certified in Gynecology and is a Fellowship-Trained Metabolic Specialist (Anti-Aging/Regenerative Medicine). He was the Chief Resident in Obstetrics/ Gynecology at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Dr. Goodyear is a partner and lead physician of Seasons Primary Care, Seasons Wellness Clinic, and Seasons The Spa in Ruston, LA and is a partner of Spring Media USA and Impact HealthCare Solutions, both located in Ruston, LA. He is the author of the book, Manboob Nation: An Integrative Medical Model To Low Testosterone.

Review of Hormone Metabolites (Progesterone, Testosterone, Cortisol)
Dogma is defined as “a belief or set of beliefs that is accepted by the members of a group without being questioned or doubted”. Dogma can also be paraphrased as doing what everybody else is doing because that is the way it has always been done. So much of what is shouted as “evidence-based” medicine or science is in fact nothing more than dogma with little or no basis in science at all. In contrast, science is defined as “a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws”. Science is the constant reevaluation and questioning of dogma to ensure elimination of bias in the pursuit of new knowledge and truth. This contrast is no more evident than in the debate of hormones. Dogma presents hormones as simply men are testosterone and women are estrogen and maybe progesterone. This is a good working definition of hormone dogma and appears simple and easy, but scientifically is inaccurate. These basic hormones are just the beginning of the hormone story
Hormone metabolites play a significant role in the rest of the story. Hormone metabolites. What are they? Waste products? Waste products without activity? Compounds targeted for elimination? Hormones with activity? Yes, no or all the above? Dogma has presented the picture of Hormone metabolites as waste products for many years. But as science goes, new knowledge through research often disproves long-held dogma and hormone metabolites are no different.
Hormone metabolites are in fact products of physiology. Simply stated, hormone metabolites are products of hormone metabolism. Hormone metabolites are just one step along the timeline of complete Hormone metabolism. Some are common, well recognized hormones i.e. Estradiol and DihydroTestosterone (DHT). Others are less known and often never-heard-of compounds.
Never-heard-of does not imply never-no activity, but this has been the long-held dogma. Hormone metabolites can and do have significant physiologic impact. Hormone metabolites are the often misunderstood and missed piece of Hormone evaluation. Hormone metabolites must be considered in the journey to optimal health and/or the treatment of disease

Educational Goals: 1) Review cortisol metabolites
2) Review estrogen metabolites
3) Review testosterone metabolites
4) Review progesterone metabolites
5) Review thyroid metabolites
6) Review hormone metabolites implication in health and disease
7) Case studies to highlight the clinical application of Hormone metabolites
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img Dr. Yang is a leading physician, board-certified psychiatrist and expert on classic forms of Chinese medicine. He incorporates acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, neuro-emotional technique, nutritional and dietary consultation, psychotherapy and medication management for the care of patients with a variety of emotional and physical illnesses. Following family tradition, he is a fifth generation teacher and practitioner of Chinese medicine, specializing in acupuncture. Dr. Yang is the founder and medical director of Tao Integrative Medicine. Dr. Yang also serves as the director of the Oriental Medicine and Acupuncture program at the Jefferson Mryna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine and is an assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In addition, Dr. Yang is part of the faculty at the Integrative Medicine Department of the University of Arizona. Dr. Yang is a board member of the International Organization of Integrative Mental Health and a member of the American Medical Association.

Integration of Acupuncture with Modern Medicine
Acupuncture is among one of the most commonly used modalities as a complementary therapy to the conventional medical practice. Accumulated studies have concluded that acupuncture is a recommendable therapeutic tool for a variety of medical conditions including side effects of chemotherapy, chronic pain, chemical dependence, infertility and headaches. Basic scientific laboratory research has suggested that acupuncture helps induce endorphin production, improve blood circulation, hormone balance, immune modulation, and neurotransmitter balance.
However, the understanding of how acupuncture works, its indications for referral, its efficacy, and potential side effects have prevented practitioners and patients from the benefits of using this safe and effective modality in their health care.
This presentation is designed to discuss the basic concepts and applications of acupuncture and to help the participants better integrate acupuncture in their daily practice.

Educational Goals:
Participants should be able to describe:
1. Basic theoretic foundations of acupuncture
2. Application, efficacy, and safety of acupuncture
3. Integration of acupuncture with modern medical practice
4. Discuss case histories
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img Dr. James Andry is Assistant Clinical Professor at Indiana University School of Medicine and president of Andry Medical Services. He received his medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine and has been in practice for 16 years. He is a leader in the fields of personalized and preventative family medical care, bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, and hormonal/behavioral weight management. Dr. Andry holds dual board certifications. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Family Medicine and the American Board of Obesity Medicine. Dr. Andry serves on the Board of Directors as a Trustee of the American Society of Bariatric Physicians, a world-wide organization dedicated to the medical treatment of the obese and overweight.


Brain Modulation and Weight Management: New Pharmaceutical Approaches to Treating Obese and Overweight Patients
Weight is an element of patient health that is critical to manage in our patients. Patients and clinicians alike often feel very frustrated about attempts at weight loss and the rapid regain of weight that follows most weight loss efforts for patients. Weight gain occurs because of a fundamental mismatch between the genetic code we have inherited and the current environment we live in in Western Society with readily available food, and low requirements for physical activity for survival.
We will discuss the pharmaceutical approach to management of obesity and the overweight state. Use of medications is appropriate as part of a comprehensive functional medicine weight treatment program. There are a number of agents that have recently been approved to assist in weight management with various mechanisms of action including agents that assist with satiety, appetite, impulse control, glucose regulation, insulin and glucagon activity, and metabolic rate. We will discuss these new agents, their physiology, risks and benefits, and strategies for use. We will also discuss agents which have been time-tested as helpful for management of the overweight and obese states and their use in treating obesity and its many co-morbidities. As a board certified bariatrician, Dr. Andry will share this valuable information that can be of great use to all clinicians who are interested in managing weight within their functional medicine practices.

Educational Goals:
1. To understand the current burden of obesity and obesity related illness in the United States
2. To Identify the common brain anatomical and neuro-hormonal targets by various obesity treatments
3. To understand how genetic polymorphisms in different neuropeptide and neuro-hormone systems impact obesity
img
img Dr. Yang is a leading physician, board-certified psychiatrist and expert on classic forms of Chinese medicine. He incorporates acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, neuro-emotional technique, nutritional and dietary consultation, psychotherapy and medication management for the care of patients with a variety of emotional and physical illnesses. Following family tradition, he is a fifth generation teacher and practitioner of Chinese medicine, specializing in acupuncture. Dr. Yang is the founder and medical director of Tao Integrative Medicine. Dr. Yang also serves as the director of the Oriental Medicine and Acupuncture program at the Jefferson Mryna Brind Center of Integrative Medicine and is an assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In addition, Dr. Yang is part of the faculty at the Integrative Medicine Department of the University of Arizona. Dr. Yang is a board member of the International Organization of Integrative Mental Health and a member of the American Medical Association.

Introduction to Chinese Herbal Medicine
While many Americans have some degree of knowledge on acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine has remained to be very confusing and a foreign concept to most American healthcare professionals and the general population. Due to the lack of knowledge and concerns over the quality of Chinese herbal products, most of us chose to keep quite a distance from it.
However, in addition to acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine is the most important therapeutically modality in the context of classic Chinese medicine. The maturity and thousands years of clinical experience and knowledge accumulated makes Chinese herbal medicine a true gem for practitioners and patients.
This presentation is designed to clarify the confusion and introduce the practice principles and strategies that make Chinese herbal medicine a safe and effective addition to modern medical practice.

Educational Goals:
Participants should be able to describe
1. The nature and characteristics of Chinese herbal medicine
2. Application, efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine
3. Integration with modern biomedical therapies.
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img Dr. Eldred B. Taylor, M.D. is a well-known, dynamic speaker on functional and anti-aging Medicine. He is a sought-after radio and television personality. Dr. Taylor has been featured in local and national publications. He is the co-author of two books, "Are Your Hormone Making You Sick?" and "The Stress Connection". Dr. Taylor is originally from Nashville, Tennessee, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He earned his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Taylor completed his internship and residency specialty training in obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University where he served as Chief Resident of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He served as Assistant Clinical Professor at Emory University School of Medicine for many years. Dr. Taylor also served as a faculty member for the Fellowship in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine for several years where he taught basic and advanced hormone replacement to hundreds of fellows. He is an internationally known medical lecturer and leading expert on functional medicine with a special focus on diagnosing and treating hormonal imbalances. To date, Dr. Taylor has provided over 500 hours of continuing medical education on functional and anti-aging medicine. He currently practices functional and anti-aging medicine in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife, Ava Bell-Taylor, M.D.

The Nuts and Bolts of Hormone Replacement
The ongoing controversy concerning bio-identical hormone replacement can be answered by applying gynecological endocrinology. The recognized authoritative textbook worldwide on gynecologic endocrinology is Speroff, L., Glass, R., Kase, N., Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility, 7th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD, 2005. According to Speroff, “The ultimate biologic response reflects the balance of actions of the different hormones with their respective receptors” . To achieve the ultimate biologic response one must use hormones that perfectly match our receptors. The body only has receptors for bio-identical hormones. The second requirement is that the hormones have to be balanced. It is much easier to balance hormones if the hormones are measured appropriately. I will discuss the pros and cons of blood, saliva and urine measurement of hormones.
Speroff’s textbook can and will answer all the questions about estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and the other steroid hormones. By reviewing gynecologic physiology and biochemistry and applying these basic principles physicians will be able to make logical decisions concerning restoration of hormone balance. Restoration of hormone balance is the key to treating PCOS, PMS, irregular bleeding, preventing breast cancer, treating peri-menopause, menopause and osteoporosis.

Educational Goals:
1. Understand steroid hormone function and their relationship to each other
2. Understand the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods to measure hormones.
3. Understand the importance of balancing the actions of steroid hormone
4. Simplify hormone replacement by following hormone physiology
2015 Conference Recordings |  2014 Conference Recordings
AFMA Conference Recordings 2015


Our AFMA 2015 Fall Conference is available by way of video streaming . You can watch our incredible collection of medical expert anywhere in the world. For only $499, you can view the entire conference on your computer. Each lecture will be delivered to you in high definition. Once you have made your purchase, we will send you a user name, password and instructions on how to log-in to enjoy faculty lectures.

Buy Online:

Purchase Individual Lecture
for $35 each

Purchase All 4 Days Lecture
For only $499


Lecture Topics for AFMA 2015 Conference Recording


Day 1, Thursday, November 12, 2015    $149.00

Eldred B. Taylor, M.D.
The Role of Stress and Hormones on Brain Health   
David Zava, Ph.D
Neuro-Active Steroids and Brain Function   
Eldred B. Taylor, M.D.
Understanding The Disease of Obesity   
Tom Bayne, D.C.
Understanding the Role of Commensal
Spore Based Organisms in Clinical Practice
   
William Shaw, Ph.D.
Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health   
Denis Wilson, M.D.
Maximizing Results and Well-being in Thyroid Diagnosis and Management   
Nathan S. Bryan, Ph.D.
The Role of Nitric Oxide in Health and Aging: From Telemeres to Sexual Dysfunction   

Day 2, Friday, November 13, 2015    $149.00

Eldred B.Taylor, M.D.
The Fundamentals of Brain Health   
Valerie Ferdinand, N.D.
Pharmacogenetics - The Prescription Medication Puzzle Food   
Emil Schandi, Ph.D.
Pre-visual Cancer Tumor Markers: Early Detection of Cancer   
David Zava, Ph.D.
Hormone Metabolites and Breast Cancer   

Day 3, Saturday, November 14, 2015   $149.00

Aristo Vojdani, Ph.D.
Immune Reactivity and Autoimmunity: Mechanism of Action   
Donese Worden, N.D.
The Power of Enzymes   
Tom O Bryan, D.C.
Dietary Fueling and Endotoxin Initiating Neurological Disorders   
Tom O Bryan, D.C.
The Role of Food Sensitivity in Autoimmune and Chronic Disease   
George Gillson,M.D.,Ph.D
The Clinical Importance of Methylation   
Nathan Goodyear, M.D.
ReviewHormoneMetabolites (Progesterone, Testosterone, Cortisol)   

Day 4, Sunday, November 15, 2015    $149.00

J.D. Yang, M.D.
The Role of Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture in Healthcare   
James Andry, M.D.
Brain Modulation and Weight Management: New Pharmaceutical
Approaches to treating Obese and Overweight Patients
   
J.D. Yang, M.D.
Understanding Chinese Herbal Medicine   
Eldred B. Taylor,M.D.
The Nuts and Bolts of Hormone Replacement by the Book   


AFMA Conference Recordings 2014


Our AFMA 2014 Fall Conference is available by way of video streaming . You can watch our incredible collection of medical expert anywhere in the world. For only $399, you can view the entire conference on your computer. Each lecture will be delivered to you in high definition. Once you have made your purchase, we will send you a user name, password and instructions on how to log-in to enjoy faculty lectures.

Buy Online:

Purchase Individual Lecture
for $35 each

Purchase All 3 Days Lecture
For only $399


Lecture Topics for AFMA 2014 Conference Recording


Day 1, November 6, 2014   $149.00

Eldred B. Taylor, M.D.
Hormone Replacement by the Book.   
David Zava, Ph.D
Estrogen Metabolism and Cancer Risk.   
Tim Guilford M.D.
Oxidation Stress and Metabolism of Cancer.   
Erin Lommen, N.D.
Cravings, Contentment and Correcting Chemical Imbalances   
Aristo Vojdani, Ph.D.
The Gut-Brain Axis in Autoimmune and Neuroimmune Disorders   

Day 2, November 7, 2014   $149.00

Eldred B.Taylor, M.D.
Stress Connection: How Stress Causes Hormone Dysfunction   
Cheryl Burdette, N.D.
The Science of Food; Lowering the Inflammatory Load Through Lifestyle   
Rachel Fresco, Ph.D.
The Good, the Bad, and the Microbiome   
Jay Mead, M.D.
Becoming Immune to Cancer   
Russell Jaffe, Ph.D.
Predictive Biomarkers in Clinical Nutrition   

Day 3, November 8, 2014   $149.00

Nathan Goodyear, M.D.
The Biochemical Dysfunction(s) of Metabolic Syndrome   
William Grant, Ph.D.
The Benefits of Vitamin D with Chronic and Infectious Diseases   
David Zava, Ph.D.
Elements and Thyroid   
James Andry, M.D.
The Biochemistry and Psychology of "Diabesity"   
Ellie Campbell, D.O.
Protecting the Aging Brain: Functional Neurology   

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